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HOME   -   HISTORY TIMELINES   -   TIMELINES OF THE MEXICAN REVOLUTION   -   YEAR 1911

 
   


Zapata retires, Mexican History 1911
ZAPATA RETIRES
Mexican History 1911
 

Mexican Revolution Timeline - Year 1911
 

First Week of February 1911

Pascual Orozco and his Chihuahuas attack Ciudad Juárez, where approx 500 federal troops are stationed. They had an agreement with  Francisco I. Madero, who was still in Texas at the time.

The idea was that Madero and his men would come back into the country as soon as Orozco and his men had Ciudad Juárez under control.


However, the Mexican government had sent reinforcements direction north and they defeated Orozco upon his attack and forced him to flee.


February 4, 1911

The federal 10th regiment led by Colonel Antonio Rábago leave Casas Grandes by train to aid their comrades in defending Ciudad Juárez.

They get as far as Bauche station where the rebels had cut off the rails, resulting in the First Battle of Bauche.

Pascual Orozco and his revolutionaries fought the feds this afternoon and night.

Oscar Merrit Wheelock, aka Captain Oscar G. Creighton, might or might not have been directly responsible for the disrupted tracks. You can read more about The Dynamite Devil on Rick Sullivan's site.


February 5, 1911
Second and last day of the First Battle of Bauche. Rabago and his team abandon the train and continue their journey inland and make it to Ciudad Juárez.


February 7, 1911
Gabriel Tepepa and Lucio Moreno start their revolution but their timing was awful. After a quick initial success, their movement got stuck in the hills because nobody was really ready to run with them. Zapata didn't chime in because he was still waiting for Torres Burgos to come back from his
Madero mission.

Battle of Smelter View -
Pascual Orozco and his men are fighting near El Paso / Juarez at the Rio Grande river banks.


Mid February 1911
Torres Burgos returns at last.
Emiliano Zapata and his men had sent him to meet with Francisco I. Madero, to check the man out and his intentions. Zapata wanted to make sure Madero was no flake and that Madero was worth risking lives for.

Torres Burgos reported a thumbs up and the revolutionaries got organized: Zapata was made colonel. Patricio Leyva was made chief revolutionary. Torres Burgos was made chief revolutionary number two, in case something happened to Patricio.

The new idea of the Zapatistas was to start the revolution in Villa de Ayala and then go south, instead of north. Don't take on the north until the south was lined up. Also: Gabriel Tepepa, a potential rival, had to be won over.


February 14, 1911
President Porfirio Díaz put some pressure on the American government, who then issued an order for
Madero's arrest. Madero crosses the border back into Mexico near Ciudad Juárez.


March 1911
Emiliano Zapata and 5,000 men shuffle to the city of Cuautla and close the road to the capital, Mexico City.

 
March 6, 1911
Battle of Casas Grandes, Chihuahua. Maderista rebels vs. Federal troops. The federals win.


March 8, 1911
Morelo's governor Pablo Escandón y Barrón orders an expansion of the state police force. Simultaneously, the hacienda owners strengthened their own private armies.


March 10, 1911
The revolutionaries meet at Cuautla to discuss when to start the revolution full force. Attending: Torres Burgos, Rafael Merino, Emiliano Zapata and more.
Zapata says they're not ready yet because a) there exists a lack of unity among the revolutionary chiefs and b) the revolutionaries don't have enough weapons and ammunition. Zapata is overruled. The revolution will begin tomorrow.


March 11, 1911
The revolutionaries took the police office in Villa de Ayala, gathered the people and Torres Burgos read to the crowd the
Plan of San Luis Potosí. At which occasion Otilio E. Montaño yelled "¡Abajo las Haciendas y Vivan los Pueblos!", Down with the haciendas, long live the towns.


March 12, 1911
Fighting at Agua Prieta, Sonora


March 16, 1911
In Juárez, someone set some nitroglycerin on fire and tried to blow up the housing of the Federal troops stationed there.


March 18, 1911
A cannon