EmersonKent.com - History for the Relaxed Historian
HISTORY FOR THE RELAXED HISTORIAN


 

PEOPLE IN HISTORY          WARS, BATTLES AND REVOLUTIONS          MAP ARCHIVE          FAMOUS SPEECHES

 
 

GOVERNMENTS IN HISTORY          HISTORIC DOCUMENTS          HISTORIC PLACES AND LOCATIONS          ALL-TIME RECORDS IN HISTORY

 
 

SOURCE TEXT          SOURCE DOCUMENTS          HISTORY DICTIONARY          TIMELINES          ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORDS

 
 

HOME   -   FAMOUS SPEECHES IN HISTORY   -   WORLD PEACE

 
   


JFK'S COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 1963
JFK'S COMMENCEMENT ADDRESS AT AMERICAN UNIVERSITY 1963
 

World Peace

Go here for more about  John F. Kennedy.

Go here for more about
 JFK's World Peace speech.


Here is the video clip of JFK's World Peace speech. It is split into three parts. Scroll down for the full transcript.

 

 

 

It follows the full text transcript of John F. Kennedy's Commencement Address at American University, also known as his World Peace speech, delivered at John M. Reeves Athletic Field, American University, Washington D.C. - June 10, 1963.


 

JFK - World Peace 1963 President Anderson, members of the faculty, board of trustees, distinguished guests, my old colleague, Senator Bob Byrd, who has earned his degree through many years of attending night law school, while I am earning mine in the next 30 minutes, distinguished guests, ladies and gentlemen:

It is with great pride that I participate in this ceremony of the American University, sponsored by the Methodist Church, founded by Bishop John Fletcher Hurst, and first opened by President Woodrow Wilson in 1914. This is a young and growing university, but it has already fulfilled Bishop Hurst's enlightened hope for the study of history and public affairs in a city devoted to the making of history and the conduct of the public's business. By sponsoring this institution of higher learning for all who wish to learn, whatever their color or their creed, the Methodists of this area and the Nation deserve the Nation's thanks, and I commend all those who are today graduating.

Professor Woodrow Wilson once said that every man sent out from a university should be a man of his nation as well as a man of his time, and I am confident that the men and women who carry the honor of graduating from this institution will continue to give from their lives, from their talents, a high measure of public service and public support.

"There are few earthly things more beautiful than a university," wrote John Masefield in his tribute to English universities--and his words are equally true today. He did not refer to spires and towers, to campus greens and ivied walls. He admired the splendid beauty of the university, he said, because it was "a place where those who hate ignorance may strive to know, where those who perceive truth may strive to make others see."

I have, therefore, chosen this time and this place to discuss a topic on which ignorance too often abounds and the tru