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HOME   -   PEOPLE IN HISTORY A-Z   -   ANDREW JACKSON

 
   


ANDREW JACKSON 1767-1845

 

Andrew Jackson 1767-1845

 


 

From 1829 to 1837, Andrew Jackson was the 7th President of the United States.

They called him Old Hickory. Some trivia: Andrew Jackson was the first U.S. president born in a log cabin.

And if you are interested in "firsts", Jackson was also the first president to ride in a train. Scroll down for another first that occurred in the context of an assassination attempt on President Jackson's life.

 

STATUE OF MAJOR GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON - LAFAYETTE PARK, WASHINGTON D.C.
STATUE OF MAJOR GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON
LAFAYETTE PARK, WASHINGTON D.C.

 



GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON

Andrew Jackson was a general in the War of 1812 as well as in the Creek War.

On January 8, 1815, he fought the British in the Battle of New Orleans and won a decisive victory.

GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON
GENERAL ANDREW JACKSON

 


PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON

The 1828 election campaign was bitter and dirty. And this is some of the dirt that got thrown about:

Andrew Jackson and his wife Rachel Donelson Jackson married in 1791. At this point Rachel was legally still wed to a previous fellow, Lewis Robards. The error was that she had obtained a permission for divorce but not the divorce itself. The Jacksons discovered the mistake, the divorce was granted, and the two re-married in 1794.


The bloodhounds of the scandal press had a field day. Gossip of adultery and bigamy was nicely spread throughout the election of 1828.

John Quincy Adams rode the wave that carried him the highest and did not fail to exploit this mistake of the Jacksons.

This was just one of the ugly chapters in the book of the private feuds between Adams and Jackson.

Tragedy struck on December 22, 1828, when Rachel Jackson died. Her husband blamed her death on the stress caused by the public whirl about their alleged immoral conduct.


On March 4, 1829, Andrew Jackson delivered his
First Inaugural Address on the East Portico of the U.S. Capitol in Washington D.C. This was the first inaugural ceremony held on the east front of the U.S. Capitol.

Jackson's Vice President was John C. Calhoun.


The people liked it, and on March 4, 1833, Jackson gave his
Second Inaugural Address.

Jackson's Vice President was Martin Van Buren.

 

ASSASSINATION ATTEMPT ON PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON

On January 30, 1835, Andrew Jackson became the first U.S. president to experience and survive an assassination attempt.

ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION ON PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON 1835
ATTEMPTED ASSASSINATION ON PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON 1835


On said day, President Jackson was attending the state funeral of South Carolina congressman Warren R. Davis at the Capitol Building in Washington D.C.

Richard Lawrence, an unemployed house painter, read in the newspaper that Jackson would attend and staked out the East Portico.

When Jackson emerged, Lawrence stepped from behind a pillar 13 feet away and drew two single-shot pistols at Jackson's back. The cap of one fired, but the bulled didn't fire. Jackson heard the noise, and charged Lawrence with his cane raised. Lawrence fired the second pistol, but it also misfired.


Lawrence was apprehended, and tried on April 11, 1835. U.S. Attorney and Star-Spangled Banner author  Francis Scott Key charged him with assault with intent to kill. After 5 minutes, the jury found Lawrence not guilty by reason of insanity. He was committed to a mental hospital.

In 1861, Richard Lawrence died in the St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington D.C.


See also
Assassinations in History

 

PRESIDENT ANDREW JACKSON'S RETIREMENT

Chief Justice Roger B. Taney was asked for his input in drafting a final message to the nation. On March 4, 1837, Andrew Jackson packed his bundle, delivered his Farewell Address, and left business matters in the hands of his successor, the 8th U.S. President, Martin Van Buren.

Another first. On March 4, 1837, it was the first time that an outgoing and an incoming president rode together in a carriage to the Capitol for the inaugural. Jackson and Van Buren were friends.

 

See also Governments of the United States

And maybe the American Timeline.

 

 

First President of the U.S.
 
George Washington 1789 - 1797
Second President of the U.S.
 
John Adams 1797 - 1801
Third President of the U.S.
 
Thomas Jefferson 1801 - 1809
Fourth President of the U.S.
 

James Madison

1809 - 1817
Fifth President of the U.S.
 
James Monroe 1817 - 1825
Sixth President of the U.S.
 
John Quincy Adams 1825 - 1829
Seventh President of the U.S.
 
Andrew Jackson 1829 - 1837

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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