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HOME   -   HISTORIC DOCUMENTS   -   TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO 1848

 
   


 

 

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo 1848

 

 

 

 

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Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo - Original Document.

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The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo was signed on February 2, 1848, and it expanded the territory of the United States by 525,000 square miles. The United States stretched now from the Atlantic to the Pacific.

Go here for a full transcript of the treaty.

Here you can view the full transcript as PDF - 16 pages, 178 kb



Who or What in the World is a Guadalupe Hidalgo?

Guadalupe Hidalgo is a village north of Mexico City.

 

Who Signed the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo and Why?

The United States and Mexico signed a treaty in this village on February 2, 1848. The treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo ended the Mexican War.

 

What Was Agreed Upon in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo?

The mutual border changed. A new border was set at the Rio Grande and the Gila River, thus the United States had managed to annex Texas.

With the same treaty another big chunk of land was signed over to the U.S., namely what's today your California, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and part of Colorado and Wyoming, for a measly $15 million.

 

Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo 1848 and Gadsden Purchase 1854
TREATY OF GUADALUPE HIDALGO - MAP
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What Were the Consequences of the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo?

Instead of opening a keg together and celebrating the new purchase as brothers, almost immediately the North and the South started bickering over whether or not slavery should be extended into these new territories.

This disagreement grew into the Compromise of 1850, the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, and