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ON THE PRINCIPLES OF THE CONSERVATIVE PARTY - DISRAELI 1872
ON THE PRINCIPLES OF THE CONSERVATIVE PARTY - DISRAELI 1872
 

Sanitas Sanitatum, Omnia Sanitas

Go here for more about  Benjamin Disraeli.

Go here for more about
 Benjamin Disraeli's Sanitas Sanitatum, Omnia Sanitas Speech.


 

 


Photo above:
Benjamin Disraeli. Mansell/Time Inc.


It follows the transcript of Benjamin Disraeli's Sanitas Sanitatum, Omnia Sanitas speech, delivered at the Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England — April 3, 1872.


 

Benjamin Disraeli - Speech The Conservative party are accused

of having no program of policy. If by a program is meant a plan to despoil churches and plunder landlords, I admit we have no program. If by a program is meant a policy which assails or menaces every institution and every interest, every class and every calling in the country, I admit we have no program. But if to have a policy with distinct ends, and these such as most deeply interest the great body of the nation, be a becoming program for a political party, then I contend we have an adequate program and one which, here or elsewhere, I shall always be prepared to assert and to vindicate.

Gentlemen, the program of the Conservative party is to maintain the Constitution of the country. I have not come down to Manchester to deliver an essay on the English Constitution; but when the banner of republicanism is unfurled when the fundamental principles of our institutions are controverted I think, perhaps, it may not be inconvenient that I should make some few practical remarks upon the character of our Constitution upon that monarchy limited by the coordinate authority of the estates of the realm, which, under the title of Queen, Lords, and Commons, has contributed so greatly to the prosperity of this country, and with the maintenance of which I believe that prosperity is bound up.

Gentlemen, since the settlement of that Constitution, now nearly two centuries ago, England has never experienced a revolution, though there is no country in which there has been so continuous and such considerable change. How is this? Because the wisdom of your forefathers placed the prize of supreme power