PEOPLE IN HISTORY          WARS, BATTLES AND REVOLUTIONS          MAP ARCHIVE          FAMOUS SPEECHES

 
 

GOVERNMENTS IN HISTORY          HISTORIC DOCUMENTS          HISTORIC PLACES AND LOCATIONS          ALL-TIME RECORDS IN HISTORY

 
 

SOURCE TEXT          SOURCE DOCUMENTS          HISTORY DICTIONARY          TIMELINES          ARCHAEOLOGICAL RECORDS

 
 

 
 

HOME   -   HISTORIC DOCUMENTS   -   DECLARATION OF PILLNITZ 1791

 
   


Pillnitz Castle, near Dresden, Germany
Pillnitz Castle


Declaration of Pillnitz — August 27, 1791

Prodded by the outbreak of the French Revolution on July 14, 1789, monarchists in Europe felt considerably crept out. And rightly so.

Image Above

Pillnitz Castle, near Dresden, Germany — A gift from  Augustus II the Strong to his mistress, the Countess Constantia von Cosel, back in the days when men knew how to reward a decent relationship.

© Schlösserland Sachsen



The aristocracy of France emigrated, at least the ones who could pack their bags swiftly enough, and tried to re-establish their power from abroad. One of these émigrés was the Comte of Artois, brother of the French
King Louis XVI. The latter would end up on the guillotine in 1793.

The Comte of Artois himself would become French King Charles X in 1824. But back to the Declaration of Pillnitz.

The Comte of Artois called for a meeting at Pillnitz Palace, and from August 25 to 27, 1791, he discussed with Frederick William II, king of Prussia, and  Leopold II, Holy Roman emperor, the recent political developments in European history.

The result was the Declaration of Pillnitz.

 

Significance of the Declaration of Pillnitz

By appealing to all European monarchs to help re-establishing the French monarchy, this declaration made the French Revolution a European question.

In France, this declaration was regarded as an avowal to undo the Revolution.

France declared war on Austria on April 20, 1792, thus commencing the French Revolutionary Wars