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HOME   -   FAMOUS SPEECHES IN HISTORY   -   AIN'T I A WOMAN?

 
   


SOJOURNER TRUTH 1864
SOJOURNER TRUTH 1864
 

Ain't I a Woman?

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 Sojourner Truth's Ain't I a Woman speech.


It follows the full text transcript of Sojourner Truth's Ain't I a Woman speech, delivered at the Women's Rights Convention in Akron, Ohio - May 28, 1851. This text has been compiled by the Educational Services of South Dakota.




 

 

[Sojourner Truth spoke in a southern dialect that might be difficult for modern readers. Here is the speech in modern English:]

Well, children, where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter. I think that 'twixt the negroes of the South and the women at the North, all talking about rights, the white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all this here talking about?

That man over there says that women need to be helped into carriages, and lifted over ditches, and to have the best place everywhere. Nobody ever helps me into carriages, or over mud-puddles, or gives me any best place! And ar'n't I a woman?

Look at me! Look at my arm! I have ploughed and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ar'n't I a woman?

I could work as much and eat as much as a man - when I could get it - and bear the lash as well! And ain't I a woman?

I have borne thirteen children, and seen most all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Then they talk about this thing in the head; what's this they call it? [member of audience whispers, "intellect"] That's it, honey. What's that got to do with women's rights or negroes' rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yours holds a quart, wouldn't you be mean not to let me have my little half measure full?

Then that little man in black there, he says women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wasn't a woman! Where did your Christ come from? Where did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothing to do with Him.

If the first woman God ever made was strong enough to turn the world upside down all alone, these women together ought to be able to turn it back and get it right side up again!

And now they is asking to do it, the men better let them.

Obliged to you for hearing me, and now old Sojourner ain't got nothing more to say.

 


[The original speech as recounted by
Frances Gage in The History of Woman Suffrage, volume 1, co-authored with Susan B. Anthony, published in 1881:]

Wall, chilern, whar dar is so much racket dar must be somethin' out o' kilter. I tink dat 'twixt de niggers of de Souf and de womin at de Norf, all talkin' 'bout rights, de white men will be in a fix pretty soon. But what's all dis here talkin' 'bout?

Dat man ober dar say dat womin needs to be helped into carriages, and lifted ober ditches, and to hab de best place everywhar. Nobody eber helps me into carriages, or ober mud-puddles, or gibs me any best place!"

And raising herself to her full height, and her voice to a pitch like rolling thunder, she asked:

And ain't I a woman?

Look at me! Look at my arm!

And she bared her right arm to the shoulder, showing her tremendous muscular power.

I have ploughed, and planted, and gathered into barns, and no man could head me! And ain't I a woman?

I could work as much and eat as much as a man, when I could get it, and bear de lash as well! And ain't I a woman?

I have borne thirteen chilern, and seen 'em mos' all sold off to slavery, and when I cried out with my mother's grief, none but Jesus heard me! And ain't I a woman?

Den dey talks 'bout dis ting in de head; what dis dey call it?

"Intellect," whispered some one near.

Dat's it, honey. What's dat got to do wid womin's rights or nigger's rights? If my cup won't hold but a pint, and yourn holds a quart, wouldn't ye be mean not to let me have my little half-measure full?

And she pointed her significant finger, and sent a keen glance at the minister who had made the argument. The cheering was long and loud.

Den dat little man in black dar, he say women can't have as much rights as men, 'cause Christ wan't a woman! Whar did your Christ come from?

Rolling thunder couldn't have stilled that crowd, as did those deep, wonderful tones, as she stood there with out-stretched arms and eyes of fire. Raising her voice still louder, she repeated,

Whar did your Christ come from? From God and a woman! Man had nothin' to do wid Him.

Oh, what a rebuke that was to that little man. Turning again to another objector, she took up the defense of Mother Eve. I can not follow her through it all. It was pointed, and witty, and solemn; eliciting at almost every sentence deafening applause; and she ended by asserting:

If de fust woman God ever made was strong enough to turn de world upside down all alone, dese women togedder

and she glanced her eye over the platform

ought to be able to turn it back, and get it right side up again! And now dey is asking to do it, de men better let 'em."

Long-continued cheering greeted this.

'Bleeged to ye for hearin' on me, and now ole Sojourner han't got nothin' more to say."

[Recent scholarship has disputed whether this account, written about 30 years after the speech was given, is an accurate representation of Truth's speaking style. The dialect, in particular, may have been an addition by Gage. For more on this dispute, see Aint I A Woman Delivered by Sojourner Truth by About's Guide to African American History, Jessica McElrath.]
 

 

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