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OTTO VON BISMARCK - CREATOR OF THE GERMAN EMPIRE
OTTO VON BISMARCK - CREATOR OF THE GERMAN EMPIRE
 

Blood and Iron

 


Go here for more about
Otto von Bismarck.

Go here for more about
Bismarck's Blood and Iron speech.


 

It follows an excerpt transcript of Otto von Bismarck's Blood and Iron speech, delivered at Berlin, Germany - September 30, 1862.

Go here for the German version of this speech.


 

Otto von Bismarck - Speech Bismarck responds to Max von Forckenbeck's lengthy arguments about appropriation rights and Art. 99 of the constitution and the people's wish for a shortened military service:

He would like to go into the budget for 1862, though without making a prejudicial statement. An abuse of constitutional rights could be undertaken by any side; this would then lead to a reaction from the other side.

The Crown for example could dissolve parliament twelve times in a row, that would certainly be permitted according to the letter of the constitution, but it would be an abuse.

It could just as easily reject cuts in the budget, immoderately. It would be hard to tell where to draw the line there. Would it be at 6 million? At 16? Or at 60?

There are members of the National Association [Nationalverein] of this association that has achieved a reputation owing to the justness of its demands, highly esteemed members who have stated that all standing armies are superfluous. Well, what if a public assembly had this view! Would not a government have to reject this?

There was talk about the sobriety of the Prussian people. Yes, the great independence of the individual makes it difficult in Prussia to govern with the constitution or to consolidate the constitution.

In France things are different, there this individual independence is lacking. A constitutional crisis would not be disgraceful, but honorable instead.

Furthermore, we are perhaps too well-educated to support a constitution. We are too critical. The ability to assess government measures and records of the public assembly is too common. In the country there are a lot of catiline [conspiratorial] characters who have a great interest in upheavals. This may sound paradoxical, but everything proves how hard constitutional life is in Prussia.

Furthermore, one is too sensitive about the government's mistakes, as if it were enough to say this and that cabinet minister made mistakes, as if one wasn't adversely affected oneself. Public opinion changes, the press is not the same as public opinion. One knows how the press is written.

Members of parliament have a higher duty, to lead opinion, to stand above it. We are too hot-blooded. We have a preference for putting on armor that is too big for ou